Live on Periscope – The Loneliness Culture

Video

  • Now more than ever, Americans report an increased rate of loneliness, despite being more electronically connected than ever before.
  • “The majority of Americans seem to not want universal healthcare,” Gowri Parameswaran, professor and chair of educational studies at the State University of New York at New Paltz.  “To me, that’s a very lonely place to be, where you don’t feel like others deserve help.”
  • The trend of increased loneliness is creating a “selfish” society in America, and is spreading through technology to other countries.
  • Presenters claim that, because of social media, people know about each other before even meeting and talking, therefore defeating the need.

The technology that connects people also isolates.

Presenters

John Zeswitz, executive vice-president for Lancaster Bible College.

Gowri Parameswaran, professor and chair of educational studies at the State University of New York at New Paltz.

Kripa Sreepada, MHA candidate in the Sloan Masters in Health Administration Program at Cornell University.

Ashley Ford, staff writer at BuzzFeed.Com, was not at the presentation.

For more live videos on Periscope, follow The Springfield Report on Twitter for videos and tweets about upcoming and important events.

The Giant Water Bottle

Video

  •   Students for a Sustainable Future built a giant water bottle, to raise awareness of  disposable waste.
  •  “SSF hopes this bottle will educate students about waste and motivate them,” said Emma Donovan.
  • With around 1,700 bottles sold on MSU’s campus each day, recycling needs to have a bigger presence.
  • RecycleMania is a competition to measure recycling efforts on college campuses, ending April 13, 2015.

Motivating to Recycle

Spring Forecast for Springfield

Video

  • Ted Keller, KTTS meteorologist, provided an extended forecast into the spring season for Springfield residents.
  • “I don’t see any strong signals for wet, dry, hot or cold this spring,” Ted Keller, KTTS meteorologist and former journalist, said in a telephone interview. “This spring is going to be very normal for Springfield.”
  • Readers should care because everyone should be prepared or spring weather, even in a normal spring, the weather can be very active.
  • It’s been a while since Springfield has had a wet spring, but with nature greening up already, the probability of fires starting with premature summer heat goes down.

Springing into warmer weather.

Only 35 states have a city named Springfield, but every year has a spring.
For 2015, the spring season is expected to be fairly normal in terms of weather conditions.
“I don’t see any strong signals for wet, dry, hot or cold this spring,” Ted Keller, KTTS meteorologist and former journalist, said in a telephone interview. “This spring is going to be very normal for Springfield.”
A normal spring season will begin with temperatures starting in the 70s in months like April, then rising to the 80s in later months. April and May are typically the most active months for storms or tornadoes, which are most normal in springtime.
According to Keller, it’s been a while since Springfield has seen a wet spring, and this tradition is expected to continue into the spring season on 2015 with a normal amount of rain, with an average of 3 – 5 inches per month for March, April and May.
“The last two springs have been quiet,” Keller said. “Even with tornadoes, we’ve only have weak ones over the past few years. The stronger ones are remembered by those who experience them. As a general phenomenon, tornadoes are technically standard for spring.”
With a normal spring ahead giving no strong signals, the bar has been set high for the summer months.
“What you always look for in summer is a decent amount of rainfall,” Keller said. “Things have already started to green up outside, which is good. Dry leaves and hot winds are normally a danger, but with things looking greener, that’s less of a concern as we get into hotter months in summer.”
With a normal spring ahead, the weather will be one last thing for Springfield residents to significantly worry about.

The video below displays the spontaneous nature and intensity of Spring storm, and how a single day can have dark skies, thunder, rain, and hail.

 

SOGI Protections In Columbia, Missouri

Audio

  • Mayor Bob McDavid spoke on Columbia, MO’s inclusion of gender identity in its non discrimination ordinance.
  • “This is a pretty welcoming community, and I think it was just accepted.” –Mayor Bob McDavid
  • Springfield, MO will vote on including protections for sexual orientation and gender identity April 7th.
  • By 2011, Columbia had protection for both sexual orientation and gender identity.

    Conversation With Mayor Bob McDavid


Reporters:

Melissa Stallbaumer

Victoria Valenti

Gabrielle Ervie

Amanda Radash

Taylor Cernetich

Kirksville Equality Bill: The Process

Video

Kirksville is the 12th city in Missouri to add sexual orientation to its list of protected classes and two municipalities both city staff and supporters have focused on have reported mixed use of their human rights commissions.

There are no protections in housing, employment or public accommodation at the state or federal level for sexual orientation or gender identity, City Attorney Howard Hickman told the Council during its study session discussions this spring.

“The state commission only hears allegations of discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, sex, disability, age (in employment only) and familial status (in housing only),” said Tom Bastian, acting director of Communications with the Missouri Labor Department.

“The public accommodations section may prove the most debatable within the ordinance, with the city’s legal authority stating he believes the ordinance can be interpreted with a “common sense” mentality but that he would still consider a men’s restroom for males and a women’s restroom for females.” said Tom Bastian.